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Anniversary of the Election of Pope Francis
Vatican City

Anniversary of the Election of Pope Francis 2019 and 2020

Pope Francis was elected on 13 March 2013 after the resignation of Pope Benedict XVI. The anniversary of his selection is a major holiday in Vatican City.

YearDateDayHoliday
201913 MarWedAnniversary of the Election of Pope Francis
202013 MarFriAnniversary of the Election of Pope Francis

Pope Francis was born Jorge Mario Bergoglio and is the first pope from the Southern Hemisphere. He is the first Jesuit pope and the first non-European pope since Pope Gregory III in 741. He chose his papal name to honour St. Francis of Assisi. He was inaugurated on 19 March 2013, and his motto became “Miserando atque Eligendo” or “lowly but chosen.” The motto was taken from the Venerable Bede on Saint Matthew’s Gospel.

On the anniversary of Pope Francis’ election, mass is normally held at the Vatican and Catholic churches throughout the area. During the mass, people pray for the pope’s continued health and well-being while asking God to guide him in his decisions for the Catholic church.

On the anniversary of his election, many people look back at his actions as the leader of the Catholic church. By some, he is viewed as a bold revolutionary chosen to make people think about their beliefs while others believe he is too progressive in his views. However, the majority of Catholics see Pope Francis as a kind, tender leader who realises some of the beliefs previously held by the church may not be fitting for today’s society.

Some of Pope Francis’ statements have been met with surprise throughout the world. He has said that religious dialogue must be broad and not simply focused on abortion or homosexuality. He believes that the Gospel is more simple, yet profound. Although he does not believe that women should be ordained priests, Pope Francis feels women are an important part of the Catholic church. He has been more accepting of homosexuality than previous pontiffs. He has called for big changes in the church, asking people to rethink what he calls “antiquated customs.”

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